Category: Copyright

How to Copyright Your Music

by: Nicholas Alfonse

One of the most essential, yet occasionally overlooked pieces of becoming a professional musician is ensuring your musical creations are copyrighted. Not only does this protect you from theft or fraud, it registers the song or album as a unique, singular creation which can never be duplicated or repeated.

From the U.S. to around the globe, there are a number of methods to safely and effectively copyright your property.

Moving hand in hand with the ongoing increased online convenience in today’s industry, the U.S. Copyright Office allows artists to register and protect their music right over the internet.

Using the eCO Online System, you can create an account, specific to your property and begin the process of copyrighting your hard earned success. eCO provides a tutorial, help system, and a complete walk through of the process, but you should still be careful while registering, making certain everything is completed completely and accurately.

After finishing the online form and double checking all of the info, eCo utilizes a simple online checkout process, wrapping everything up cleanly and swiftly. Of course, nothing in this world is free, right?

The U.S. Copyright Office charges $35.00 for an online registration, after which you’ll receive a confirmation email with further instructions.

Finally, the form must be printed and mailed in with a physical CD, or a digital upload if that’s easier for you. For those not particularly internet savvy, you can also complete a hard copy of the form to mail into the Library of Congress, which costs $50.00.

Once the forms and music are sent off, all that’s really left to do is wait. It usually takes about six months up to one year for processing, but once this is done, you’re officially registered and protected.

When mailing anything into the Library of Congress, be sure to use a shipping method with tracking numbers or confirmation, providing back up proof of your submission.

So in the end, what’s the fuss about copyrighting? The largest aspect is the protection copyrights offer you, guaranteeing a song or record is forever 100% yours. If anyone attempts to rip off one of your registered creations, the penalties can be quite high, and a lawyer can file a formal criminal complaint against the offender.

Aside from all the legal jargon, copyrights also allow artists to copy, distribute, perform, and display the products at will, maximizing the ability to promote and spread their music.

The music business can easily become a harsh place to fight for success, and copyrighting your tunes is another important way to establish yourself as a professional musician. Once an album is ready for release, check out the eCo system and see if it’s the right choice for you, as everyone’s career path is unique.

My Free Copyright.com is another method to register single songs, but doesn’t provide grounds for seeking damages on an infringement. Remember, writing exceptional music is always the priority, but one can never ignore the realities of the digital world we currently all live in.

About The Author: Use our Music Promotion Services to get the most exposure in the music industry. For details visit ArtistPR.com

Copyright Basics for Songwriters

By Kathy Unruh

Should you copyright your song? If you’re a songwriter, sooner or later you will probably have some questions about getting your material copyrighted. Since I’ve already been down this road before, you might be able to benefit from my experience. Though I am not an expert in the field, I do believe that I have some valuable information to share with you.
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I’ve noticed that there seems to be a bit of confusion regarding the subject of copyrighting. A fairly common question among people who frequent songwriting forums is “How do I copyright my song?” which, of course, is quite understandable.

Just imagine what it would be like to have one of your songs stolen, only to find out later that it grossed several hundred thousand dollars for some band you never even heard of. You might think that you would be able to console yourself with the idea that this only proves you can write a good song, but I doubt it.

More than likely, you’d be pretty upset over the whole matter and want to take legal action. The sad thing is, most people never do prosecute because they don’t have the money to hire an attorney. Even if they did, it’s not likely to be an easy case to win without proof of copyright, and many would probably “lose their shirt,” so to speak, in the process.

Nowadays, however, due to the popularity of the internet, people are sharing their original material as never before. Have you ever wondered if this is a safe thing to do? How does a copyright protect your material anyway?Continue reading Copyright Basics for Songwriters