Tag: Suzuki violin study method

Suzuki Violin Compared To Traditional Violin Lessons

By Helen Baxter

The Suzuki violin method has come to dominate the way violin is taught in America and throughout much of the world. Mention the Suzuki violin method to music educators, and you will get a variety of responses.

While it is common for some teachers to mix elements of Suzuki violin method with the traditional approach other teachers either love or hate the Suzuki method. Let’s examine the Suzuki violin versus the traditional violin below.

The Suzuki violin study method emphasizes passive modes of learning – watching and listening. Before engaging in formal study, Suzuki violin students are exposed to recordings of the first and subsequent pieces they will play, as well as recordings of great performances from the general classical repertory.

This continues when students begin formal study and as they progress. Recordings are played as “background music,” for hours each day and at low volume levels. Here, the thinking is that exposure to recordings is similar to the effect of immersion that naturally occurs in the process of primary language acquisition.

Successful study is enhanced by prolonged repeated exposure. Suzuki violin students develop an internal model of the music to be studied. They memorize the music and internalize the nuances of pitch, tone, timing, articulation, and dynamics demonstrated in recorded performances.Continue reading Suzuki Violin Compared To Traditional Violin Lessons